Perception is Everything

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The line of bales looks like the perfect end to a perfect day; and in a lot of ways it is the end of a perfect day. We are able to feed our animals a nutritious food source that will keep them healthy and happy throughout the winter.

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And we were able to do it all together as a family, on our family farm….. but sometimes we don’t always talk about the struggles in agriculture or farming. This day came with it’s fair share of trials and tribulations. From a broken baler, hay that was to dry, and time slipping away; it seemed like the day was going to be a total waste. The little things just kept piling up and somehow it seemed like those cuss words just kept slipping out, which sometime happens when farming isn’t going your way.

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With everything that kept happening lunch was pushed back more and more into the afternoon as we were racing against the clock and the sun to get done before dusk. All at once it seemed like everything worked together and it all started to fall into place.

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The bales were all hauled quickly and efficiently to the wrapper, the wrapper worked out great, and all the equipment found its home in a shed.

As that last bale went through the wrapper, and we beat the sunset by minutes we stood around and admired what we had accomplished.

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Yea it was hard, yea it was rough, and yes it seemed like we were trying to accomplish the impossible and all forces were working against us… but that is farming and life. Working together we can take on the world. As we checking the cows and the new baby calves were playing together with the sunset and that perfect row of hale bales in the background it was was instantly clear that I can’t imagine life any other way. The struggles and challenges make the successes and a job well done so much sweeter and rewarding. Life on the farm is hard but life with family is worth every second.


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A Working Controversy 

Fall is my absolute favorite time of the year. Of course, I love all the typical fall things, bonfires, sweaters and the leaves changing colors. But what makes it even better is the fact that deer season is coming, Thanksgiving is almost here and we get to do one of my favorite farm activities: working cows.

The cows headed for the lot lead by Dad and a bag of range cubes.

Most people call me crazy or at least give me weird looks when I say that I love working cows. But I just love the fact that we get to bring all the cows up, check for health issues and give them their shots, and then let them all go again. My inner cowgirl also likes to play ranch hand for a day!

All the cows are caught, lets take selfie!

Of course, whenever I say giving cows shots, I enter straight into the latest controversy, this time involving Subway.

Each year, we feed out the steers from our herd and sell that beef directly to consumers. We get a lot of questions, but none of these questions have ever stemmed from antibiotics. Mainly the questions we  are what do you feed them, do they get grass, and how do you cook brisket?

One of our butchering steers.

But when giving antibiotics, we, like most cattlemen, give the recommended dosage to keep cow and calf.

Making notes on what vaccines to give to each cow, calf and heifer.

We use syringes that can be set to give a specific amount. But when working cows, we give vaccines, not actual antibiotics. Vaccines help prevent sickness from happening, while antibiotics help stop it once it has already happened.

Bethany ready to go!

Generally, it’s Bethany’s job to know what shots are giving to each cow and how much. She will then hand that shot to our neighbor, Rex, who will either give it subcutaneous (under the skin) or intramuscular (in the muscle).

The only picture of me in the lot, of course with no cows.

Dad and I work the cows through the lot to the shoot. Most of our cows have been on our farm long enough that they know if they get through the shoot, there’s usually grain on the other side. But then you have the speedy little calves.

A cow patiently waits for her turn so she can get back to her range cubes.

Working cows in the fall also involves cutting the calves, so once one bull calf goes through the others need a little more convincing.

I get to hold the tail while our neighbor cuts the bull calves.

When it all said and done, each cows is ready to beat any problems that may come this winter, and we are dog tired!

Did I answer all your questions? If not, ask them! I would love to clarify!

~Nicole

Howdy! 

Hello! I’m Nicole, the youngest of the Show-Me Sisters.


My sister, Bethany and I have always been a part of agriculture. We grew up on our family farm in central Missouri where we have beef cattle, two horses, a dog and a small herd of cats. As kids, we had the typical farm life, jumping on hay bales, playing in creeks, and roaming the woods. We were in 4-H and eventually FFA. As kids, we were inseparable and to this day, are as close as sisters can be.

College is where our lives decided to take slightly different paths. Bethany got a degree in agriculture education while I went with Agriculture Business. I started college as a freshman who didn’t think they could handle one semester away from the farm and ended three years later, as a girl ready to take on the world.

Now, almost a year later, I finished a couple of internships and landed a job with MFA Inc. God truly blessed me when he placed me in this small town grain elevator!

You are probably wondering how we ever came to the idea of blogging.

Last week, Bethany texted me that she wanted to start a blog. Minutes later, the Show Me Sisters were born.


So strap in and join us on this crazy thing called life. Let us show you what it’s all about in our little slice of heaven!